Sword & Shield

Social media challenges teenage brain cells

Jordana Khandakji, Staff Writer

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Social media, a place where people are able to share whatever they want, whenever they want. A place where anyone can comment on every little thing that annoys them on Twitter, and then make a video of themselves explaining further in detail why they are annoyed by it on YouTube. It is somewhere where people express their political views, and then get attacked by others through a computer screen. Where people create awareness of a disease, and where multiple dogs are seen running into many glass doors.

Throughout the years, social media has been a platform for many people to get their break and also a platform where many people are seen breaking something because of some challenge on Twitter.  For the past years many challenges have been done.

The “Trust Fall Challenge” took the second grade trust building exercise to a whole new level, causing many annoyed faces throughout high school halls. This constituted watching if people would catch them when they randomly decided to fall.

Recent challenges include the “100 Layers Challenge,” consisting of putting on 100 layers of anything. This was created by a YouTube vlogger, in which she painted on 100 layers of nail polish. It spiraled into many other 100 layered challenges, including 100 layers of foundation, 100 layers of lipstick and 100 layers of shirts.

Just like the “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge”– which brought awareness to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and raised over 100 million dollars–comes a new challenge called the “#22pushupchallenge,” which requires people to do 22 push-ups. The objective of this is to create awareness for the 22 veterans that commit suicide each day. The organization behind this, called “22KILL” wants to educate people on Post traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its effects on veterans through this challenge.     “Tz Anthem” is a challenge created by 15-year-old Zay Hilfiger. Hilfiger created the song and posted a video of him doing the dance on YouTube, challenging many to do it with him. In the past month, Instagram and Twitter have been filled with videos of people doing it, some being successful, others not so successful.

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Another challenge is the “Mannequin Challenge,” which has really taken off in high schools, whereas students freeze like mannequins as “Black Beatles” by Rae Sremmurd plays in the background. South Plantation took part in this challenge at the last football game of the season.

Throughout the years many new challenges and trends have sent social media into a frenzy. Challenges like the “Cinnamon Challenge” and the “Chubby Bunny Challenge” have been around forever and will continue to do so, along with challenges that may last at most a month. No matter what it is, people will still spend hours just watching them.

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Social media challenges teenage brain cells