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Hidden Features: Not just another movie

Bayleigh Pearson, Staff writer

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A simple young girl from West
Virginia with a mind that would literally reach the stars…This is the story of Katherine Johnson, a black physicist and mathematician working for the NASA engineering divison during the 1960’s, who found herself at the crux of the historic push to put America’s rst man in space.
The lm Hidden Figures centers on the lives of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn (a gifted computer), and Mary Jackson (the rst African American female aerospace engineer). Johnson and
her genius friends begin their work in the ‘colored’ women’s computing lab, constantly working out mathematical equations for John Glenn’s 1962 space launch; towards the end of the process, the three women be- come vital resources and nally receive the credit they deserve.
The lm brings about the very real frustra- tions of being black female
during a time period that
wanted nothing to do with
them. The issues of America’s history with race were drama-
tized to evoke emotion and
spark conversation over these social dark spots.
Personally, as an African American female, this movie inspired me to not only ght for my success, but to swim against the current of ad- versity just as Johnson, Vaughn, and Jackson did during their time at NASA.
Whether one is Black, White, or otherwise, this lm will spark
thought about what America was like for African Americans throughout history and hopefully are a conversa- tion with those around you on how to make sure that the racial divide never
happens again.
The emergence of the mov-
ie could not have been more timely, given the racial division in our country and the movements it caused, such as Black Lives Matter.
The foundations of America are unfortunately not the most beau- tiful, making race a forever
sensitive and uncomfort-
able topic. But although uncomfortable, it is
important to

dis- cuss. Our
parents, grand-
parents, and beyond, who grew up
in a discriminatory America (black or white), may not want to discuss their personal experiences for fear of reliv- ing that
painful or shameful past.
But it’s time to rip o the Band- Aid. As hurtful as it is to talk about hardships in one’s past life, it is even more hurtful to keep one’s children and future generation in the dark.
History can easily repeat itself, so we must have these di cult conver- sations in order to make certain it doe

not.
In nite applause goes to the
producers of Hidden Figures: Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin, Jenno Top- ping, Pharrell Williams, and Theodore Mel , who awlessly highlighted the black excellence of these intelligent women while keeping the storyline accurate and pure.
Hearing my friends rave about Hidden Figures and praise its mes- sage and power made me feel like society was nally opening their eyes to the excellence of African Americans
in history.
I believe 2016 was the year
that changed the face of Hol- lywood forever in terms of production of lms based
on true stories. The more accurate the movie, the
better it is for those being represented in the lm.
This lm has impact- ed me, making me more motivated to succeed, not in physics or mathemati- cal algorithms, but in life
and my own endeavors. After audiences
catapulted Hidden Figures to No. 1 at the domestic box
o ce for two consecutive weeks, its stars took turns
buying out screenings of the lm and o ering the tickets to
low-income moviegoers. According to an email ob-
tained by The A.V. Club, Taraji P. Henson–the actress who portrayed Katherine Johnson, and currently lives in Chicago–wanted to “share the lm with people in her adopted hometown who otherwise wouldn’t have been able to see it,” and bought out a 2 p.m. show at the city’s AMC Ford City 14 location.
This sel ess act is what makes me more con dent in the
character of our future as a country. Sometimes, a movie is less about the money, and more about the message.

Virginia with a mind that would literally reach the stars…This is the story of Katherine Johnson, a black physicist and mathematician working for the NASA engineering divison during the 1960’s, who found herself at the crux of the historic push to put America’s rst man in space.
The lm Hidden Figures centers on the lives of Katherine
Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn (a gifted computer), and Mary Jackson (the rst African American female aerospace engineer). Johnson and
her genius friends begin their work in the ‘colored’ women’s computing lab, constantly working out mathematical equations for John Glenn’s 1962 space launch; towards the end of the process, the three women be- come vital resources and nally receive the credit they deserve.
The lm brings about the very real frustra- tions of being black female
during a time period that
wanted nothing to do with
them. The issues of America’s history with race were drama-
tized to evoke emotion and
spark conversation over these social dark spots.
Personally, as an African American female, this movie inspired me to not only ght for my success, but to swim against the current of ad- versity just as Johnson, Vaughn, and Jackson did during their time at NASA.
Whether one is Black, White, or otherwise, this lm will spark
thought about what America was like for African Americans throughout history and hopefully are a conversa- tion with those around you on how to make sure that the racial divide never
happens again.
The emergence of the mov-
ie could not have been more timely, given the racial division in our country and the movements it caused, such as Black Lives Matter.
The foundations of America are unfortunately not the most beau- tiful, making race a forever
sensitive and uncomfort-
able topic. But although uncomfortable, it is
important to

dis- cuss. Our
parents, grand-
parents, and beyond, who grew up
in a discriminatory America (black or white), may not want to discuss their personal experiences for fear of reliv- ing that
painful or shameful past.
But it’s time to rip o the Band- Aid. As hurtful as it is to talk about hardships in one’s past life, it is even more hurtful to keep one’s children and future generation in the dark.
History can easily repeat itself, so we must have these di cult conver- sations in order to make certain it doe

not.
In nite applause goes to the
producers of Hidden Figures: Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin, Jenno Top- ping, Pharrell Williams, and Theodore Mel , who awlessly highlighted the black excellence of these intelligent women while keeping the storyline accurate and pure.
Hearing my friends rave about Hidden Figures and praise its mes- sage and power made me feel like society was nally opening their eyes to the excellence of African Americans
in history.
I believe 2016 was the year
that changed the face of Hol- lywood forever in terms of production of lms based
on true stories. The more accurate the movie, the
better it is for those being represented in the lm.
This lm has impact- ed me, making me more motivated to succeed, not in physics or mathemati- cal algorithms, but in life
and my own endeavors. After audiences
catapulted Hidden Figures to No. 1 at the domestic box
o ce for two consecutive weeks, its stars took turns
buying out screenings of the lm and o ering the tickets to
low-income moviegoers. According to an email ob-
tained by The A.V. Club, Taraji P. Henson–the actress who portrayed Katherine Johnson, and currently lives in Chicago–wanted to “share the lm with people in her adopted hometown who otherwise wouldn’t have been able to see it,” and bought out a 2 p.m. show at the city’s AMC Ford City 14 location.
This sel ess act is what makes me more con dent in the
character of our future as a country. Sometimes, a movie is less about the money, and more about the message.

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Hidden Features: Not just another movie